Orders

 
Date/Type              Subject
15/06/2021
Circular
Installation of Complaint Boxes
08/06/2021
Order
Physical Verification of Stores of Sheep Husbandry Department Kashmir
05/06/2021
Order
Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak - regarding
25/05/2021
Circular
Establishment Veterinary Health Care Camps at various Highland Pastures
19/05/2021
Circular
Relaxation of probation bar in respect of newly Veterinary Assistant Surgeons
29/04/2021
Circular
Establishment of First Aid Camps for migratory Flocks
17/02/2021
Order
Placement of Mr. Abdul Khalik Najar, Driver as Chauffer
15/02/2021
Order
Implementation of National Animal Disease Control Programme (NADCP) in Kashmir Division- nomination of Nodal Officer thereof
12/02/2021
Order
Release of funds under "Assistance to States for Control of Animal Diseases (ASCAD)", a component of centrally sponsored scheme "Livestock Health & Disease Control" for its utilization during 2020-21
10/02/2021
Order
Observations made during visit to SBF Zawoora and constitution of investigation committee thereof
06/02/2021
Circular
Providing of information/details in respect of the Associations Unions registered in various Government Department
05/02/2021
Order
Authorization of funds under UT Capex Budget 2020-21
04/02/2021
Order
Authorization for release of funds through BEAMS-Capex Budget 2019-20
25/01/2021
Order
Constitution of committee of Geneticists
13/01/2021
Notification
Select list of Candidates for the post of "Stock Assistant" Animal/Sheep Husbandry Department under Hon'ble PM's special package item No. 157 (04 of 2017) dt, 28-11-2017 Divisional cadre, Kashmir for Kashmir Migrants
08/01/2021
Order
Settlement of period of un-authorized absence in favour of Dr. Zahoor -ul-Haq, Veterinary Assistant Surgeon, Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir
08/01/2021
Order
Settlement of period of un-authorized absence in favour of Dr. Asif Ali Ganie, Veterinary Assistant Surgeon, Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir
02/01/2021
Order
Upgradation of Grade pay in favour of Mr. Javaid Ahmad Dalal and Mr. Asaf Suhail Salam, Drivers
05/12/2020
Notice
Select list of candidates for the post of "Stock Assistant" Animal/Sheep Husbandry Department under Hon'ble PM's special package item No:157 (04 of 2017) Dated: 28/11/2017 Divisional cadre, Kashmir for Kashmir Migrants.
02/12/2020
Circular
Supplementary Examination of Stock Assistant Trainees session 2018-19 (Valley Batch).
09/11/2020
Order

First Appeal under RTI Act 2005 & disposal thereof

07/11/2020
Order

Nomination of Public Information Officer of SHD Kashmir

28/10/2020
Order
Policy on transfer/posting of Government employees
23/10/2020
Order
Placement/adjustment as I/c Head Assistant
23/10/2020
Order
Nomination of officers for convening of Departmental Promotion Committee meeting (Non-Gazetted) District Cadre, Sheep Husbandry Department Kashmir
21/10/2020
Order
Attachment and detachment of officers/officials
20/10/2020
Order
Provision of power Chaff Cutters- Selection of beneficiaries
17/10/2020
Order
Ramping up of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test at Directorate of Sheep Husbandry Department Complex on 19th of October 2020
01/10/2020
Notice
Auction of Wool 2020-21
23/09/2020
Order
Authorization for Release of funds under  Capex Budget 2020-21
04/09/2020
Order
Dealing of General Provident Fund Cases
01/09/2020
Circular
Ramping up of COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Testing in District Srinagar
29/08/2020
Order
Jurisdiction of SDO Bandipora, Kulgam and Shopian
 20/08/2020
Circular
Downwards migration of Govt livestock of farms from High Land pastures to sub-alpine pastures/farms
18/08/2020
Notice
Fixation of Animal Examination Charges
08/08/2020
Circular
Overstay of officials at one place

Advisories

Date Subject
02 June 2021 [IMPORTANT] Advisory for FMD (Foot & Mouth Disease) for Sheep Farmers of Valley (URDU)
30 May 2021 [IMPORTANT] Advisory for FMD (Foot & Mouth Disease) for Sheep Farmers of Valley (ENGLISH)
08 May 2021 Advisory regarding establishment of First Aid Camps enroute migration to Highland Pastures
05 May 2021 Advisory for Livestock Breeders before migration to Highland Pastures
17 April 2021 Important Advisory regarding Survival and well being of Livestock
20 Nov 2020 Important Winter Advisory concerning survival and well being of livestock of Sheep Breeders of Kashmir (ENGLISH)
16 Nov 2020 Important Winter Advisory concerning survival and well being of livestock of Sheep Breeders of Kashmir (URDU)
18 July 2020 Important Advisory regarding care of Sacrificial Animals for Eid-ul-Azha
21 May 2020 Advisory regarding establishment of First Aid Camps enroute migration to Highland Pastures (URDU)
15 May 2020 Advisory regarding establishment of First Aid Camps enroute migration to Highland Pastures (ENGLISH)
04 May 2020 Advisory for Livestock Breeders before migration to Highland Pastures (URDU)
29 April 2020

Advisory for livestock breeders before migration to highland pastures (ENGLISH)

20 April 2020 NOVAL CORONA VIRUS (COVID-19) Message to Sheep Farmers, Nomads and Chopans
17 April 2020 Advisory to Livestock Farmers, Nomads and Chopans during COVID-19 Pandemic
13 April 2020 Advisory regarding well being of livestock
 

Tenders

e-NIT / Tender Notice No./Date Subject
DSHK/Acctts/2021-22/3104-35  Dated: 19-06-2021 E-Procurement Notice for the Supply of Drugs/Medicines
ASH/Acctts/ WB/Auction/2020-21/23-28  Dated: 04-12-2020 Auction of Wool 2020-21
DSHO/Sgr/Tech/2018-19/6116-22   Dated: 26/02/2019 Short Term Quotations for supply/arrangement of Shamayana & Meals/Refreshment.
DDR/Store/2018-19/977-81    Dated: 06/09/2018 Short Term Quotation for Manufacture and Supply of one (01) number of Travis (Sheep Restrain Cage).
DSHK/supply/DI/01/2018-19/590-609 Dated:- 23/06/.2018 Fixation of Annual Rate contract for supply of Instrument / Lab Equipments/Machinery Equipments for the year 2018-19
DSHOB/Store/2017-18/4669-4672 Dated:- 28/03/2018 Short Term Tenders/Quotation for Harvesting of Departmental Crop/Hay for the year 2018-19
DDR/Store/2017-18/1830-33    Dated:- 06-03-2018 Short Term Quotation for supply of Pregnant Mare Serum Gonadotropin (PMSG)
DSHK/Supply/PS/13/2017-18/928-34 Short Term Tender for Supply of Calendars for the year 2018.
DSHK/Supply/MM/03/2017-18/535-44 Dated:- 20/07/2017 Extension of e-tenders for supply of Shearing Machine/Spares, Cattle Feed, Wheat Bran, Maize, Molasses and Rabbit Feed for the year 2017-18.
DSHK/Supp/NIT/CF/05/2017-18/05A SHD of 2017 Dated:-20/06/2017 Compounded Cattle Feed
DSHK/Supp/NIT/CF/05/2017-18/05B SHD of 2017 Dated:-20/06/2017 Wheat Bran (Sample Item)
DSHK/Supp/NIT/RF/06/2017-18/04  Dated:-20/06/2017 Rabbit Feed
DSHK/Supp/NIT/CF/05/2017-18/05C SHD of 2017 Dated:-20/06/2017 Maize Whole Grain (Sample Item)
DSHK/Supp/NIT/CF/05/2017-18/05D SHD of 2017 Dated:-20/06/2017 Molasses (Sample Item)
DSHK/Supp/Shearing/10/NIT/2017-18/06 SHD of 2017 Dated:-20/06/2017 (A) Shearing Machine (B) Shearing Spares/Accesories
DSHK/Supp/RF/06/NIT/2017-18/02 RABBIT FEED
DSHK/Supply/04/Harvest/2017-18/49-58 Dated: 01/05/2017 Harvesting of Rabi/Khrief Fodder crop at different Fodder/Sheep Breeding Farms
DDR/STORES/2016-17/805-10 Dated: 01-03-2017 Supply of polypropylene 300 ml autoclavable bottles
DSHK/Supply/SDRF/16/2016-17/2286-89 Dated: 11-02-2017 Supply of Photography/ Printing Items
DSHK/Supply/SDRF/16/2016-17/2255-59 Dated: 09-02-2017 Supply of Iron Stoves along with legs
DSHK/Supply/SDRF/16/2016-17/2249-53 Dated: 08-02-2017 Supply of Inverter With Battery
DDR/STORES/2016-17/88-100 Notice Inviting -Short Term Quotation For Supply/Printing of Publicity Items.
DDR/Store/2015-16/4381-4400 Dated: 12-03-2016 Notice Inviting- Short Term Quotation
DDR/Store/Nutri/2015-16/1657-60 Dated: 20-01-2016 Notice Inviting- Short Term Quotation
DDR/Store/2015-16/1300-06 Dated: 16-12-2015 Notification Inviting  Quotations for Servo Stabilizer /Online UPS
DDR/Tech/2015-16/1632-47 Dated: 28-11-2015 Notice Inviting offers for Printing

Seniority List

 
Representation regarding updated final seniority list of Shearing staff of Sheep Husbandry Department Kashmir and necessary correction - thereof
Tentative Seniority list of Veterinary Assistant Surgeons of Sheep Husbandry Department as it stood as on 01-12-2020
[CORRIGENDUM] Updated seniority list of Class-IV employees of District Shopian as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Baramulla as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Pulwama as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Anantnag as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Bandipora as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Kulgam as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Budgam as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Kupwara as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Srinagar as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Ganderbal as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of District Shopian as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Class-IV employees of Divisional Cadre as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Ministerial Staff of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Agriculture Wing of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Shearing Staff of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Drivers/Tractor Drivers/Cleaners of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Laboratory Staff of Disease Investigation Laboratory, Nowshera Srinagar of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Fleece Testing Laboratory Staff of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Updated Final Seniority List of Executive Staff of Sheep Husbandry Department, Kashmir Division as on 01-04-2020
Final Seniority list of Veterinary Assistant Surgeons of Sheep Husbandry Department as it stood on 01-01-2019
Tentative Seniority List of Sheep Development Officers of Sheep Husbandry Department as it stood on 01-01-2019
Tentative Seniority list of Veterinary Assistant Surgeons of Sheep Husbandry Department as it stood on 01-01-2019
Revised Final Seniority List of Assistant Stockmen of District Sheep Husbandry Organization Baramulla  from S.No.51 to 56
Final Seniority List of Forage Production Officers of Sheep Husbandry Department
Tentative Seniority List of Veterinary Assistant Surgeons of Sheep Husbandry Department
 Divisional cadre updated seniority List of Class-IV employees as on 31-12-2016

 

Videos

Activities

About the Department

 
Sheep Husbandry Department Kashmir

Mandate of promoting sheep and goat development

Areas of interest

  1. Genetic up-gradation of livestock

  2. Health Care & Extension

  3. Employment Generation

  4. Fodder development

Genetic Up-gradation

Vertical improvement of flocks

Selective breeding
(Improvement in traits is achieved by way of introduction of Elite rams/bucks into flocks -1700 Govt. Breeding Rams currently in field )

Source of Elite Rams and bucks
a) Departmental farms.
b) Local gene pool

Health Cover and Extension

Executed through:-

  • 446 Sheep Extension Centres

  • 39 First Aid Centres

  • Temporary Camps
    (1. Established at HLPs, 2. Established along migratory routes)

Employment Generation & Expansion of Livestock

Assistance to interested persons in establishing sheep & goat units under central and UT sector schemes.

Around 2200 sheep and goat units have been established during last 10 years under RKVY, MSF, TSP etc.

          ↓

Direct employment to 2200 persons.

Fodder Development

Provisions to progressive breeders/farmers:-

  • High quality fodder seeds

  • Chaff cutters

Fodder Production (hay) in Departmental Farms

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20
8810 Qntls 6087 Qntls 6141 Qntls 6952 Qntls 7400 Qntls

Institutional Resources

Types of Assets Total
Sheep Breeding Farms 8
Goat Farm 1
Rabbit Farm 1
Sheep Extension Centres 446
First Aid Centres 39
Veterinary Hospitals/Dispensaries 7
Laboratories 11

Human Resource

  Gazetted Non-Gazetted/Class-IV Total
Sanctioned Strength 219 2258 2477
In position 184 1705 1889
Vacant 35 553 558

LiveStock Development

 

 Besides various fine wool breeds like Australian Merino, Russian Merino, Russian Su the Department has introduced some dual purpose breeds of sheep like Corridale and Polldorset in areas like Sonawari, Shopian and Kulgam to quickly enhance the production of mutton. The Corridale breed has adapted well to the local environment and proved quite popular among the breeders in Orchards.

Breeds maintained: Besides various fine wool breeds like Australian Merino, Russian Merino, Russian Stevropol, the Department has introduced some dual purpose breeds of sheep like Corridale and Polldorset in areas like Sonawari, Shopian and Kulgam to quickly enhance the production of mutton. The Corridale breed has adapted well to the local environment and proved quite popular among the breeders having orchards. However, the details of breeds maintained at various farms are given as under:

Farm Breeds maintained
Sheep Breeding Farm Daksum Kashmir Merino, Imported Australian Merino
Sheep Breeding Farm Kralpathri Kashmir Merino
Sheep Breeding Farm Zawoora Corriedale
Sheep Breeding Farm Kew Kashmir Merino
Sheep Breeding Farm Dachigam/Khimber Kashmir Merino
Sheep Breeding Farm Goabal Kashmir Merino, Research on FEC-B gene
Goat Farm Arin Dardpora  
Sheep Breeding Farm Hardshiva Kashmir Merino
Sheep Breeding Farm Poshnar Kashmir Merino

 

Sheep Shearing/Dipping

 

     

  1. WHY SHOULD WE SHEAR SHEEP?
               Shearing must be practiced for the health and hygiene of each individual animal. Unlike other animals, most sheep are unable to shed. If a sheep goes too long without being shorn, a number of problems occur.
 

  • The excess wool impedes the ability of sheep to regulate their body temperatures. This can cause sheep to become overheated and die.

  • Urine, faces and other materials become trapped in the wool, attracting flies, maggots and other pests. This causes irritation, infections and endangers the health of the animal.

  • Sheep with large amounts of wool can become immobilised by physical obstacles in their path and are more susceptible to predator attacks.Preparation for Shearing

   o Don't use any non-approved non-scourable marking crayons or colour sprays in the weeks leading to shearing.
   o Don't use any insecticide chemical on the fleece for 6 weeks before shearing.
   o Remove all collars from pet sheep.
   o Remove any foreign material from the fleece (leaves, pieces of wire, hayseeds, etc.)
   o Warn shearers of any ear tags.
 

The Act of Shearing, and there after

o     Shearing can be stressful for sheep.

o    Shearing requires skill to shorn efficiently and quickly, without causing harm to sheep or shearer.

o    Try not to feed sheep the night before shearing so their stomachs are empty making it more comfortable for them while being shorn.

o    Because newly shorn sheep become colder faster, place them in paddocks with windbreaks and plenty of pasture.

o     The best time to apply louse and fly strike prevention treatments is right after shearing.

o     Providing sheep with coats or covers are a good option on small farms when the weather is cold or wet.

"To be a good shepherd is to shear the flock, not skin it"

2.     SHEARING OF SHEEP 

                Sheep make a valuable contribution to the livelihood of the economically weaker sections of the society especially in the mountainous areas by its multifaceted utility of producing wool, meat, hides and manure etc. Wool is an important product of sheep which continuously grows on it and its utility and value depends upon its quality. The fibre fineness and the staple length are two very important characteristics of the wool determining its value and utilisation. The finest wool with good staple length is used in the worsted system of yarn production and for manufacture of best quality suiting. Kashmir Merino developed in Kashmir is a fine wool breed of sheep comparable to the best wool breeds of the world. Its wool has a fibre diameter of 21 to 22 microns which is considered as the best by all standards.
              The act of cutting or removal of wool from the body of sheep is termed as shearing. Sheep are washed at least two days before shearing in order to remove dirt, suint and grease which hinder shearing. Shearing is generally done twice a year in Kashmir during spring and autumn months. Some producers prefer to shear pregnant ewes before lambing. If ewes cannot be completely shorn before lambing, they should be “crotched out” by shearing the wool from the udder and dock area and from the head and eyes of those breeds with wool on the face. This will make lambing and nursing easier. Shearing before breeding in summer season tends to increase the heat loss from the body and cools the ewe and ram, thus inducing oestrus in the ewe and stimulating spermatogenesis in the ram. The traditional way of clipping wool is the hand shearing by using shearing scissors. It is now an out dated practice and is getting replaced by machine shearing.
             Shearing doesn't usually hurt a sheep. However, shearing requires skill so that the sheep is shorn efficiently and quickly without causing cuts or injury to the sheep or shearer. Most sheep are sheared with shears or shearing machines. The fleece is removed in one piece. Some sheep are sheared manually with scissors or hand blades. While some farmers shear their own sheep, many hire professional sheep shearers. In many countries, including the United States, there is a growing shortage of qualified sheep shearers. Many states hold annual sheep shearing schools. A professional shearer can shear a sheep in less than 2 minutes. The world record is 37.9 seconds. It was set in 2016 by Ivan Scott from Ireland.
"It is the duty of a good shepherd to shear his sheep, not to skin them". (Tiberius)

 

3. METHODS OF SHEARING:-                            

1        Hand shearing

2        Machine shearing

Hand shearing:

Blade shears consist of two blades arranged similarly to scissors except that the hinge is at the end farthest from the point (not in the middle). The cutting edges pass each other as the shearer squeezes them together and shear the wool close to the animal's skin. Blade shears are still used today but in a more limited way. Blade shears leave some wool on a sheep and this is more suitable for cold climates such as the Canterbury high country in the South Island of New Zealand where approximately half a million sheep are still shorn with blade shears each year. For those areas where no powered-machinery is available blade shears are the only option. Blades are more commonly used to shear stud rams.

Machine shearing:

Machine shears, known as handpieces, operate in a similar manner to human hair clippers in that a power-driven toothed blade, known as a cutter, is driven back and forth over the surface of a comb and the wool is cut from the animal. The original machine shears were powered by a fixed hand-crank linked to the handpiece by a shaft with only two universal joints, which afforded a very limited range of motion. Later models have more joints to allow easier positioning of the handpiece on the animal. Electric motors on each stand have generally replaced overhead gear for driving the handpieces. The jointed arm is replaced in many instances with a flexible shaft.  Smaller motors allowed the production of shears in which the motor is in the handpiece; these are generally not used by professional shearers as the weight of the motor and the heat generated by it becomes bothersome with long use.

Advantages of Machine Shearing over hand shearing:

  1. It is less time consuming as it requires just 4 to 5 minutes for shearing of each animal against 20 to 30 minutes by hand shearing.

  2. It causes a smooth or uniform shave over the animal body as against hand shearing where the wool cut is irregular.

  3. Staple length is more in mechanical shearing than in hand shearing.

  4. Chances of injuries and wounds in mechanical shearing are less than in hand shearing.

  5. It does not exert stress on and is convenient for the animal as compared to hand shearing.

  6. Machine shearing is a value addition to the wool and it fetches more prices.

  7. Prevent buildup of manure and urine that can lead to parasitic infection.
     

4. PROCEDURE OF MACHINE SHEARING IN SHEEP        

1) The sheep must be held properly in a comfortable position to prevent its struggling during shearing. Most shearers use the method in which the sheep is set upon its rump and supported firmly between the shearer's knees.

2) The skin should be stretched so that it is smooth in the area being shorn.

3) Wool fibres should be cut only once next to the skin to avoid "second cuts" or short fibres of reduced value.

4) Belly wool, leg wool and tags have a lower value and should be kept separate from the higher-quality wool from the back, neck and sides.

5) The fleece should be removed in one piece so that it will remain together when tied.

6) The fleece should be tied only with paper wool twine to prevent contamination.

 

Step by Step Procedure of Shearing

 

Catching and Holding

Start at the top of the brisket

Move to the first back leg

Don't forget the tails

The undermine

The neck

The Shoulders

The long blows

Cheek and right front leg

The Final Sweeps

 

5. PRECAUTIONS DURING MACHINE SHEARING OF SHEEP

1) Cutters and combs should be sharp; and they should be cleaned, resharpened and lubricated after each job of shearing.

2) The shearing floor should be clean and free of straw or chaff. It should be swept clean of second cuts and manure tags after each shearing.

3) Sheep must be dry before shearing. Wet wool tends to heat up and become discoloured.

4) Be extremely careful when shearing around the udder, scrotum, sheath, loose skin of the flank and hamstring.

5) Never lift the unshorn fleece with the left hand and attempt to shear it off. This lifts the skin as well, which will be cut in shearing. Instead, use your left hand to stretch the skin away from the shearer.

6) Use a shearing glove on the non-shearing hand to protect yourself against injury from the handpiece.

7) Keep the electric cord of the shearer behind you so that it cannot be cut, thus preventing electric shock.

8) Do not rush through the shearing procedure in an attempt to increase speed. The appearance of the shorn sheep (which should have a minimum of cuts) and the condition of the fleece are as important as speed. An experienced shearer can shear a sheep in 5 minutes or less, which works out to about 100 sheep per day.

9) Newly shorn sheep should be protected from the cold and rain until they have had time to regrow some wool cover.

 

6. PREVENTION OF WOUND BREAKDOWN IN SHEEP SHEARING WOUNDS

Shearers should take care to avoid causing shearing wounds. When stitching a large shearing wound, shearers can minimize the risk of contamination and assist the healing process by taking the following steps:

- Keeping needles and cotton in antiseptic solution

- Washing the wound site and your hands with a suitable antiseptic solution

- Keeping stitches less than 3cm apart

- Spraying the stitched wound with a suitable antiseptic spray

- Marking the sheep so it can be easily identified and the healing wound can be assessed. Usually, a wound is completely healed between two and four weeks, depending on its size and location. Severe wounds that involve more than the skin layer (deep hamstring wounds or open belly wounds) and wounds to sensitive areas (the pizzle and teats) are painful and stitching must not be attempted. Seek immediate veterinary advice or humanely euthanase the animal.

Sheep suffering pain or distress from any severe wounds or wound infections must not be transported. If you are unsure whether or not the animal is fit to load, seek veterinary advice.

DIPPING

Dipping means putting or washing animal in medicated water in order to cure or prevent from ectoparasites, sheep scab, mange, get clean wool, remove waste materials and dung from fleece and keep away sheep blow flies. It is usually done once in a year before post winter shearing or before post autumn shearing. It is also done when the incidence of ectoparasites is high. After about 10 days shearing is followed by dipping.

Methods of Dipping:

A.    Hand bath: it is used for small flock. Sheep are lifted one by one into a tank of galvanized iron (1.2 x1.0x0.5 m) and kept for 2 minutes. Sheep are then placed on drain board to drain off surplus dip back into tank.

B.     Swim bath: it is used for large sized flock. Two to three sheep are dipped at a time. Examples:

  1. Injectibles: Ivermectin, Doramectin and Moxidectin (@200 μg/kg b.w s/c ) in Late spring (1 to 31 May) and late autumn (1st to 30th November ).May be repeated after 7-15 days, if needed, in case of severely affected animals.

  2. Insecticides: like Diazinon (0.01%), Flumethtrin (0.5%), Coumaphos (0.1%). Spraying or dipping with insecticides may be repeated in case of heavy infestations as per circumstantial evidences
    Precautions:

1.      Avoid dipping in advanced stage of pregnancy.

2.      Always water the sheep before dipping to avoid drinking of dip solution.

3.      Avoid dipping on rainy days so that dip may not be washed off.

4.      Avoid dipping of sick animals, animals with wounds and young lambs.

5.      Avoid dipping in rams in breeding season to guard from injury to pen

 

Kashmir Merino

The National Agriculture Commission recommended development of fine wool breeds in the state. Local Kashmir valley ewes were crossed with Australian Merino Rams & F1 Ewes were bred to Delain Rams of USA. F2 were bred among themselves after proper selection on the basis of wool quality & body weight. The matting among F2 generation continued till a breed with steady & uniform characters evolved which was named as "Kashmir Merino".

The breed is comparable to some of the finest wool breeds of the world with fiber diameter of 20-24 Microns, besides attaining higher birth weaning & adult body weight.

New Page 1

Some traits of economic importance of Kashmir Merino are as under:

Sex

Birth Wt.

 

( Kgs)

Weaning Wt.

( Kgs)

Weight at 1   Year

( Kgs)

Weight at 2   Year

( Kgs)

Greasy Fleace Wt.

( Kgs)

Staple length

(Cms.)

Fibre Diameter

( Microns)

Male

3.6

22.40

42.00

53.60

4.1

5.7

21.1

Female

3.5

21.50

35.30

47.70

3.4

5.5

19.7

 

Characteristics of some local/Indigenous sheep

Breed

Birth Wt.

 

( Kgs)

Weaning Wt.

( Kgs)

Weight at 1   Year

( Kgs)

Weight at 2   Year

( Kgs)

Greasy Fleace Wt.

( Kgs)

Staple length

(Cms.)

Fibre Diameter

( Microns)

Medullation

%

Kashmir valley

1.500

8.500

18.0

25.000.

0.860

8.00

29.4

12.0

Gaddie

1.800

9.000

17.000

26.000

0.817

6.800

29.3

25.0

Karnahi

2.000

9.500

18.000

27.000

0.950

10.0

44.2

14.0

Gurezi

2.200

9.500

21.000

27.000

1.250

9.50

31.o

27.0

           The Department established sheep breeding farms at different locations for under taking cross breeding & other research programmes on scientific lines. Rams are being produced in these farms for serving the private flocks for their up gradation. Presently the Department runs 8 such farms in the various districts of the valley.

           Simultaneously sheep Extension Centers were opened at length & breadth of the state to facilitate cross breeding & genetic improvement of local livestock, and other technical programmes like Castrations, Lamb markings, Docking, Health cover, Mechanical shearing & Education of farmers about Scientific farming practices. The Department has so far distributed about 29000 breeding rams produced in its farms for crossbreeding in private flocks. Importation of livestock was also made on many occasions & breeds like Russian Stavropol, Rambouillet, Corriedale & Merino?s were imported from countries like USSR, USA & Newzealand for introducing the blood into the local livestock. Corriedale a dual purpose breed known for producing more wool and lamb has been introduced in belts of Shopian and Sonawari and reared in orchards and silvipastoral practices are encouraged.      

EVOLUTION OF KASHMIR MERINO

 

 

Forage Production

 

Department of Sheep Husbandry Kashmir has a separate wing of Agriculture meant for fodder development out of its own resources to meet the requirement of the departmental livestock at various Sheep Breeding Farms. Moreover, the department is also engaged for improving the fodder production of the farmers associated with sheep & goat rearing. In this regard many initiatives have been taken in the past under various centrally sponsored schemes like RKVY, ATMA, NLM and Feed & Fodder development. Various inputs have been provided to the farmers which include distribution of quality seed kits like Red Clover, Annual/Perennial Rye Grass, Tall Fescue, White Clover, Hybrid Oats, Berseem etc. and provision of machinery like chaff cutters, brush cutters on subsidized rates.
   During the past few years the department has distributed Seed mini Kits & Chaff Cutters (Hand/Power driven) to various beneficiaries.
   The department has a total land availability of 3,000 Kanals for fodder production and efforts are on to reclaim more and more areas for fodder production to meet the requirement of departmental farm animals. Since the stall feeding of farm animals extends from 15th November to 15th April, the department has to spend a large amount of budget on feed & fodder requirement of livestock and the department makes all efforts through its Agriculture Section to achieve self-sufficiency in the fodder requirements. On an average an adult farm sheep requires 2.25 quintals of fodder during stall feeding and on an average the department requires 9,000-10,000 quintals of fodder annually. The department is marching towards self-sufficiency as regards the production of quality fodder. Presently the department grows the Rabi crops of Oats and Rye Grass on about 2000 kanals and Kharief Crops of M.P Charri (Sorghum) on the same area of land and perennial crops of Rye grass & Clovers on about 1000 kanals of land.

   The annual production of fodder grasses of the department currently is about 8000 quintals. The major fodder production stations of the department are as follows:-
 

S.No

Name of the Farm/Location

Location

Land put to Cultivation under

Annual crop (Kanals)

Land put to Cultivation under

Perennial crop             (Kanals)

Total land under cultivation

(Annual+Perennial)

 (Kanals)

1.

SBF Daksum

Anantnag

-

400

400

2.

SBF Goabal

Ganderbal

200

-

200

3.

SBF Kralpathri

Budgam

-

242

242

4.

SBF Zawoora

Pulwama

800

-

800

5.

SBF Kewa

Kulgam

32

200

232

6.

SBF Poshnar

Kupwara

700

-

700

7.

SBF Hardshiva

Baramulla

70

-

70

8.

ARF Wussan

Baramulla

35

50

85

9.

GF Arindardpora

Bandipora

70

-

70

10.

Fodder station  Kunan

Bandipora

10

-

10

11.

FF Topper

Baramulla

130

-

130

12.

FF Rambirpora

Anatnag

90

-

90

13.

Fodder station Zakura

Srinagar

25

-

25

14.

Fodder station Lar

Ganderbal

25

-

25

15.

Fodder Station Haknar

Ganderbal

-

28

28

16.

Fodder Station Rankipora

Budgam

32.60

-

32.60

17.

FF wanihama

Ganderbal

205

-

205

18.

FS Ganeshpora/ Vailoo/ YKPora

Anantnag

40

 

40

 

 

Total

2464.60

920.00

3384.60

 

⁕ Staff associated with Agriculture Section: - The Agriculture staff associated with different agricultural/fodder development activities mainly comprise of Deputy Director Feed & Fodder, Agriculture Field Assistants, Agriculture Supervisors, Rakh overseer, Field men etc.


⁕ Tractorization/Tilling of the land is done exclusively by three departmental tractors.


⁕Hay Production for the year 2019-20:- Total hay production for the year 2019-20 is 7559.44 quintals.
 

Achievements of Department

Major Achievements

  • Around 85% of sheep are of improved variety (Cross Breeds) which produces finer wool and are fast growing.
  • Ours is the finest wool producing region in the country.
  • 35% of Mutton demand is met locally.

Contribution to Economy

2019-20

Item Quantity Value Approx. Cost
Mutton 112 (Lac kgs) Rs. 500 Crore Rs. 450 per kg
Wool 32 (Lac kgs) Rs. 32 Crore Rs. 100 per kg

Total: Rs. 532 Crore

Demand and Supply (2019-20)

Product Local Demand Local Produce Imports
Mutton 310 lac kgs 112 lac kgs 198 lac kgs
Wool Nil 32.74 lac kgs Nil
Hides Nil 8.5 lacs Nil
FLIGHT OF CAPITAL: Rs 800-900 corers per year. (Mutton supply from neighbouring states)

Current Scenario

Huge local demand for mutton and wide gap between demand and supply
                              ↓
Focus is on increasing the mutton production and sustaining the gains (fineness etc) already achieved in wool.
                              ↓
Emphasis on growth and weight gain characteristics for obtaining a progeny with traits of more and quick growth.

Accelerated Breed Improvement

In order to boost the ongoing breed improvement programme and to negate the ill effects of inbreeding, which have crept-in for last several, the department has just imported 420 sheep of Merino breed from Australlia. These shall be bred in departmental farms and their progeny supplied to field for dessemination of high quality germplasm with ultimate aim of significantly increasing the mutton and wool production.

New Technological Interventions

Introduction of Assisted reproductive techniques in Sheep & Goats.

  • Introduction of Embryo Transfer /A

  • Artificial Insemination techniques to enhance reproductive rates and productivity is in pipeline.

  • Sufficient trained manpower has been developed in such techniques.

  • Civil works for ETT and AI laboratory have been completed. Only pendency is strengthening of laboratory in terms of equipments.

  • The techniques are expected to be introduced shortly.
     

Promoting Multiplicity

Project for increasing twin/triplet births through introgression of Fec-B gene, has been underway at Sheep Farm Goabal for last several years.

Department is now propagating Fec B gene in field, through supply of Fec B Rams, for better returns to farmers in terms of twin/triplet births.

Infrastructural Strengthening

For ensuring better delivery of services to farmers and timely health care to livestock, the department constructed 42 structures like centres, dispensaries, hospitals & laboratories during last ten years. Additional 9 such structures are under construction.

PROPOSED TARGETS OVER THE NEXT 7 YEARS

  • Increase mutton production by about 60 percent from present 112 lac kgs to 175 lac kgs.
  • Increase wool production by about 40 percent from present 34 lac kgs to 50 lac kgs.
  • Creation of about thousands of jobs through sheep farming via establishment of units in private sector.

 

 

Citizen Charter

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GOVERNMENT OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR

DIRECTORATE OF SHEEP HUSBANDRY KASHMIR

C I T I Z E N S      C H A R T E R

SERVICES OFFERED BY THE SHEEP HUSBANDRY DEPARTMENT KASHMIR

NAME OF THE SERVICES RENDERED/FACILITIES PROVIDED

NAME OF THE INSTITUTION/CENTRE OF THE DEPT. PROVIDING THE SERVICE

A)  UP GRADATION OF FLOCKS THROUGH CROSS BREEDING PROGRAMMES TO INCREASE MUTTON AND WOOL PRODUCTION.   

      

I.  BY INTRODUCING GENETICALLY

     SUPERIOR RAMS IN THE FLOCKS    

II.  CASTRATION OF SCRUB RAMS IN THE

     PRIVATE FLOCKS

ELITE RAMS PRODUCED AT DEPARTMENTAL SHEEP BREEDING FARMS AND ALSO PROCURED FROM LOCAL GENE POOL.

THE SERVICES CATERED THROUGH 449 SHEEP EXTENSION CENTERS AND 53 FIRST AID CENTERS SPREAD IN KASHMIR PROVINCE UNDER THE CONTROL OF DISTRICT SHEEP HUSBANDRY OFFICERS.

B) VETERINARY HEALTH CARE

        i.   TREATMENT OF CLINICAL CASES

        ii.   ANTHELMINTHIC DOSING AND

              VACCINATION AGAINST IMPORTANT   

              DISEASES LIKE CLOSTRIDIAL DISEASES,  

              SHEEP POX, FMD, PPR ETC.

              MEDICATED BATHS  TO CURTAIL  

              ECONOMIC  LOSSES TO FARMERS ON ACCOUNT OF

              DEATH AND DISEASES

i.     THROUGH  DOOR STEP SERVICES BY SHEEP

        EXTENSION CENTERS AND FIRST AID

        CENTERS  UNDER THE CONTROL OF  

        DISTRICT SHEEP   HUSBANDRY OFFICERS.  

ii.     AMBULATORY SERVICES

iii.    MOBILE CAMPS

iv.    FIRST AID CAMPS ESTABLISHED AT

        HIGHLAND PASTURES DURING SUMMER

        MONTHS  

C)    DISEASE INVESTIGATION ,DIAGNOSIS SURVEILLANCE AND GUIDANCE FOR TREATMENT AND CONTROL

1)  CENTRAL DISEASE INVESTIGATION LABORATORY AT NOWSHERA SRINAGAR.

2) DISTRICT LABORATORIES AT  DISTRICT HEAD QUARTERS. 

D)   MACHINE     SHEARING OF PRIVATE LIVESTOCK FOR VALUE ADDITION OF WOOL

 

1)  DISTRICT SHEEP HUSBANDRY OFFICES

2)  DIRECTORATE OF SHEEP HUSBANDRY    KASHMIR.

                                          

E ) PROCUREMENT OF WOOL DIRECTLY FROM FARMERS TO AVOID EXPLOITATION BY MIDDLE MEN

BY SHEEP EXTENSION CENTERS (PROCURED BY SHEEP AND SHEEP PRODUCTS DEV. BOARD)

F)       WOOL AND PASHMINA TESTING FOR QUALITY ANALYSIS

FLEECE TESTING LABORATORY AT NOWSHERA SRINAGAR

G)       ESTABLISHMENT OF INCOME GENERATING UNITS THROUGH STATE AND CENTRAL SCHEMES LIKE MINISHEEP FARM SCHEME (50 ewes),

RKVY, (25 ewes participatory mode)

 IDSRR, (500 ewes) ETC.

 

DISTRICT SHEEP HUSBANDRY OFFICES THROUGH DESIGNATED COMMITTEES.

H)    HONORARIUM AND INCENTIVE TO CHOPANS FOR THEIR COOPERATION IN IMPLEMENTING DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMMES

DISTRICT SHEEP HUSBANDRY OFFICES

I)    RABBIT PRODUCTION AND SALE ON CERTAIN SEASONS

ANGORA RABBIT FARM WUSSAN PATTAN

DISTRICT BARAMULLA

J)        EXTENSION ACTIVITIES

     SENSITIZATION OF FARMERS REGARDING   

     SCIENTIFIC FLOCK MANAGEMENT

     

 

1) DISTRICT SHEEP HUSBANDRY OFFICES BY

     I AWARENESS CAMPS

     II TOURS AND FARM DARSHAN PROGRAMMES

2)  EXTENSION AND PUBLICITY WING OF DIRECTORATE OF SHEEP HUSBANDRY THROUGH PRINT AND ELECTRONIC MEDIA

K)     FODDER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES

    BY PROVIDING SEED KITS AND OTHER INPUTS

FODDER DEV. WING OF DIRECTORATE OF SHEEP HUSBANDRY DEPARTMENT KASHMIR

 

Right to Information

Citizen Charter            RTI,Act 2005        Guide on RTI Act

Nomination of First Appellant Authority/Public Information Officers/Assistant Public Information officers in the Department of Sheep Husbandry Kashmir

List of First Appellant Authority/Public Information Officers/Assistant Public Information Officers to deal with the applications/cases under Right to Information Act,2005

S.No Name and Designation of First Appellant Authority Jurisdiction
1. Mr. Bashir Ahmad Khan (KAS),
Director Sheep Husbandry Department Kashmir
Whole Kashmir Division
     
S.No Name and Designation of Public Information Officer Jurisdiction
1. Dr Syed Moin ul Haq,
Central PIO SHD Kashmir (DDC,SHD Kashmir)
Whole Kashmir Division
2. Dr.Zubair Ahsan Kabli,
PIO SHD Anantnag (DSHO Anantnag)
District Anantnag
3. Dr. Showkat Ahmad,
PIO SHD Bandipora (DSHO Bandipora)
District Bandipora
4. Dr.Peer Irshad,
PIO SHD Baramulla (DSHO Baramulla)
District Baramulla
5. Dr. Mohammad Ashraf Baba,
PIO SHD Budgam (DSHO Budgam)
District Budgam
6. Dr. Javid Ahmad Baba,
PIO SHD Ganderbal (DSHO Ganderbal)
District Ganderbal
7. Dr.Mohammad Rafiq Shah,
PIO SHD Kulgam (DSHO Kulgam)
District Kulgam
8. Dr.Mohammad Haider,
PIO SHD Kupwara (DSHO Kupwara)
District Kupwara
9. Dr.Mohammad Shafi Mir,
PIO SHD Pulwama (DSHO Pulwama)
District Pulwama
10. Dr.Mohammad Rafiq Shah,
PIO SHD Shopian (DSHO Shopian)
District Shopian
11. Dr.Ajay Sudan,
PIO SHD Srinagar (DSHO Srinagar)
District Srinagar
     
S.No Name and Designation of Assistant Public Information Officers Jurisdiction
1. Dr. Jan Mohammad Wani,
APIO SHD Vailoo Anantnag (VAS Vailoo)
Vailoo, Sagam and Larnoo belts
2. Dr.Basit Nazir,
APIO SHD Dachipora Anantnag (VAS Dachnipora)
Serigufwara, Bijbehara and Khiram belts
3. Dr. Asima Hameed,
APIO SHD Kangan (VAS Kangan Ganderbal)
Kangan and Naranag belts
4. Dr.Faisal Hassan Dedmeri,
APIO SHD Beerwah (VAS Beerwah Budgam)
Beerwah, Khag, Kawoora and Gundipora belts
5. Dr. Misbah Amin,
APIO SHD Raithan (VAS Raithan Budgam)
Raithan, Khansahib, Wterhail and Harpanzoo belts
6. Dr. Saima Mushtaq,
APIO SHD Rafiabad (VAS Rafiabad Baramulla)
Rafiabad and Rohama belts
7. Dr. Qaiser Gani,
APIO SHD Karnah (SDO Karnah)
Karnah Belt
8. Dr. Ashiq Ashraf,
APIO SHD Handwara (SDO Handwara)
Handwara Belt
9. Dr. Bilal Maqbool Banday,
APIO SHD Gurez (SDO Gurez)
Gurez Belt
10. Dr. Nuzhat Wali,
APIO SHD Hajin (SDO Hajin)
Hajin and Sumbal belts
11. Dr.Wasim Muzaffar,
APIO SHD Uri (SDO Uri)
Uri belt
12. Dr. Shahid Nabi Qadri,
APIO SHD Pattan (VAS Pattan)
Pattan, Tappar and Singhpora belts
13. Dr. Imran Nazir,
Central APIO SHDK (Technical Officer, Gen. DSHK)
Whole Kashmir Division
14. Dr. Ajaz Ahmad Baba,
APIO SHD Tangmarg (VAS Tangmarg)
Tangmarg and Kunzer belts
15. Dr. Hamayun Rashid,
APIO SHD Zainapora (VAS Zainapora Shpian)
Zainapora belt
16. Dr. Abdul Majeed Kisana,
APIO SHD D H Pora (SDO Kulgam)
D H Pora, D K Marg and Manzgam belts
17. Dr. Aquil Mohammad,
APIO SHD Sogam (VAS Sogam Kupwara)
Sogam, Wavoora and Kalaros belts
18. Dr. Rafeh Ahmad Bhat,
APIO SHD Tral (VAS Aripal Tral)
Tral, Aripal and Awantipora
 

 

 

Inception of Department

 

Sheep Husbandry Department came into existence in the year 1962 with the main objective of promoting sheep and goat development in the state having sufficient scope and potential owing to bountiful pastures and meadow lands presenting nutrient grasses and herbage for the pastoral activities. The department so established was headed by a Director with a Deputy Director for each Jammu and Kashmir divisions. In early seventies a major expansion took place with the creation of joint Directors, Deputy and Assistant Director level officers.

          In the year 1982, the Department of Sheep Husbandry was bifurcated into two parts and accordingly two separate Departments of Sheep Husbandry one for Kashmir and another for Jammu came into existence. As a result of this bifurcation, the sheep husbandry sector got sharp focus at provincial level. The Department of Sheep Husbandry Kashmir, having its area of operation in Kashmir Division comprising of ten districts of Kashmir Valley and two districts of Ladakh, witnessed vast organisational expansion both vertically and horizontally.

          At present, the Department has a staff organisation consisting of various subject matter specialists and two major line organisations one looking after the farms and the other field extension activities. Each organisation is headed by a Joint Director. In the area of farm management, the Joint Director (Farms) is assisted by senior level officers to run the nine farms established so far in Kashmir Division. Similarly, to implement and monitor various field programmes/activities, the Joint Director (Extension) is assisted by ten District Organisations each headed by a District Sheep Husbandry Officer and 10 Sheep and Wool Development Organisations
 

 

 

 

Sheep Breeds

 

Sheep Breeds of Jammu and Kashmir

  

        Favourable agro-climatic conditions and other natural endowments including rich alpine pastures made the sheep and goat rearing as the core activity of rural masses of the Jammu and Kashmir State from the times immemorial to play a vital role in the socio-economic up-liftment of the most weaker sections of the society viz Chopans, Gujjars , Gaddies, and Bakerwals. However, at that time, the economic returns from sheep and goat rearing were non-significant due to low productivity of the available genetic material.

       As the developmental activities related to sheep and goat were carried out in the State under the auspices of Animal Husbandry Department, no concrete sheep developmental programme could be under taken except some cross-breeding experiments/trials till 1962, when Sheep Breeding and Developmental Department was carved out of Animal Husbandry Department for look after of sheep husbandry Sector. The newly formed Department of Sheep Husbandry right from its inception laid maximum emphasis on cross-breeding programme which resulted in substantial progress in production of wool and mutton. With a view to improve quantity and quality of the traits of the indigenous sheep of the State up to desired level, it is essential to have knowledge of the indigenous material i.e. types or strains of sheep found in the State. Initially no survey of sheep in this regard has been made in the State. However, efforts made by some researchers are appreciable in this respect.

        Some types of breeds found in Jammu and Kashmir State are given below which is expected to serve useful purpose for those research workers and technocrats who are interested to know about the types of sheep present in the State.

 

GUREZI

Photo Credit - Dr. Mubashir Ali Rathar

Habitat Gurez Tehsil of Kashmir.
Characteristics

The Gurezi Sheep is the biggest among the  Kashmir breeds. Animals are coarse woolen dairy animals, usually white and polled. The majority of sheep are hornless. However, recently some animals even with more than two horns (Poly-ceros condition) were observed. These sheep have short ears and wool in predominantly white. However, a number of coloured sheep are also maintained for getting wools of natural shades of grey, black and brown. The animals graze rich grasses at 8000 ft in summer but are stall fed in winter .

Wool Yield 1.250 - 1.500 kilograms per annum.
Wool Quality Medium fine about 6 inches long and lacking kemps.
GADDI

Habitat Kistwar and Baderwah Tehsils of Jammu and Kulu, Chamba and Kangra Valleys of Himachal Pradesh.
Characteristics

Gaddies are hill tribes who are traditional sheep breeders raising this breed. These sheep are small in size but have sturdy legs with short tails and ears. They live on scrub forest during winter and in summer they migrate to Paddar and other neighbouring ranges. The fleece is generally white with brown coloured hair on the face. The rams are horned and ewes hornless.

Wool Yield  0.817 kg per annum.
Wool Quality Medium fine with average fiber dia-meter 34.90 micron (u) and staple length 10.10 centimetres. The wool in good sheep is lustrous and under coat is used for manufacture of kulu shawls and blankets.
KASHMIR VALLEY
Habitat Kashmir Valley at an attitude of 5000-6000 ft
Characteristics

Animals are smaller in size with predominantly coloured fleece yielding an admixture of medium fine and coarse wool. These animals have short tails with males having small horns.

Wool Yield 0.860 + 0.010 kg per annum
Wool Quality Admixture of coarse and medium fine with fibre diameter and staple length varying from 28 to 34 u (micron) and 8 to 10 centimetres respectively.
KARNAHI

Photo Credit - Dr. Altaf Peerzada

Habitat Karnah Tehsil at an attitude of 1200-4600 meters.
Characteristics

The animals are robust, having long face and a prominent nose. Rams have big curved horns. The fleece is relatively fine though shorter than that of Guresi, breed of sheep.

Wool Yield 1.000 - 1.250 kg per annum.
Wool Quality Medium fine wool having average fiber diameter of 29.70 u (micron) and staple length of 9.36 centimetres.
BAKERWALI

Photo Credit - Dr. Mubashir Ali Rathar

Habitat

Migratory sheep reared by the nomadic tribe called Bakerwals. Their movements include high ranges of Pirpanchal mountains, Kashmir Valley and other low lying hills of Jammu and Kashmir. Being migratory these sheep live in   open through out the year.

Characteristics

These sheep are hardly and sturdy and are excellent climbers in-spite of its big bulk. The males are generally horned and ewes hornless. Some flocks are fat tailed. Ears are generally long, broad and dropping. These sheep grow coloured coarse wool, which is used locally for manufacture of coarse lohis (Small blankets).

Wool Yield 1.600 kg per annum.
Wool Quality Coarse wool of 6 inches long and 1/679 inch in diameter.
POONCHI

Photo Credit - Dr. Mubashir Ali Rathar

Habitat Poonch and surrounding places situated at a high elevation in the State.
Characteristics

Animals are long sized, mostly hornless with short tail but thick at the base. Ears are generally short and colour is predominantly white. These sheep are best for wool production and are raised on rich summer pastures and are stall fed during winter on stored grasses and fodders.

Wool Yield 1.6 kg per annum..
Wool Quality Medium fine with average fiber diameter 32 u (micron)

 

Disease Investigation Lab

Animal Science Quarterly by Disease Investigation Lab, Nowshera

 

DIL, Nowshera of SHD Kashmir is the leading laboratory amongst four divisional labs of departments of Animal/Sheep Husbandry Jammu & Kashmir in terms of:

  • Launching highly effective programme of control of Sheep Pox after getting conducted successful trials of Killed Sheep Pox vaccine.

  • Orchestrating the most successful cross breeding programme in India in sheep by way of development of Kashmir Merino breed through strategic disease control program and monitoring production parameters.

  • Starting PCR for molecular diagnosis of diseases.

  • Marker assisted selection studies in breeding programmes including Fec B genotyping contributing to doubling production.

  • Initiating work on Cell culture mode of vaccine production.

  • Initiating work on Embryo Transfer Technology and A.I. in sheep and goat.

  • Conducting Drug trials.

  • Analyzer based analysis of feed and fodder and pathological investigations.

  • Studying indigenous sheep breed Gurezi and extensively study cross breed Kashmir Merino.

  • Printing research journal, Disease Bulletin and Breeder’s Manual besides several papers in national or international journals/abstracts for national level conferences.

  • Conducting several studies on ethno-veterinary medicine, cross breeding programmes, Brucellosis, presence of E coli toxins in locally slaughtered sheep, trials on commonly used dosings, review of ethics of industrial farming etc. Research work continued in DIL on Gene sequences of two different genes of Orf virus strains prevalent in Sheep and Goat of Kashmir Valley submitted to NCBI GenBank have helped put DIL staff on international map.
     

    Its other distinctions include:

  • The first in India to identify Clostridium septicum from field outbreaks (Nucleotide sequence GENBANK Accession No. KtY440186) and report Eperythozoon.

  • Standardizing protocols (PCR based) for confirmation of diseases such as Enterotoxaemias (C. perfringens A, B, C, D & E), Braxy (C. septicum). Brucellosis (Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis) and is currently providing PCR based diagnosis of almost all economically important diseases including PPR, Sheep Pox, Goat Pox, Orf, FMD, CCPP sparing the need for approaching other labs for diagnosis in most cases.

  • Achieving exemplary control of menacing Sheep Pox and Fasciolosis and lately PPR. No outbreak of any disease has been allowed to flare up beyond control in last few decades. The laboratory has played a pivotal role in facilitating timely diagnosis and control of Brucellosis in farms and tackle outbreaks in field.

  • Publishing Teur, Teur Chu Son Seur and pamphlets on major diseases like Brucellosis.

  • Launching massive regular weekly outreach/awareness cum training programme with field extension agencies field.
    Working on several projects on disease prevalence and monitoring, using local resources without any significant financial implications.

  • Collaborating with other institutions for various studies including with FVSc & AH for diagnosis of Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus, studies on poisonous plants in Kashmir valley,

Journals of

Deputy Director Research

 Back to Disease Investigation Lab Page

 

JOURNAL INDEX

Sheep Breeding Practices in India

Practical Aspects of Anthelmintic Therapy in Small Ruminants

Environmental Factors Affecting Growth Performance up-to Weaning in Kashmir Merino Sheep

Ethno-Veterinary Anthelmintics if Kashmir Valley

A Study on Constraints Perceived by Sheep Farmers of District Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir

Acute Levamisole-Fenbendazole (Levob) Poisoning in A Sheep Flock

Studies to Access the Awareness Among Sheep Breeders Regarding Parasitism and its Management in Srinagar and Ganderbal Districts

Levamisole Toxicity in Sheep: Case Study

A Case for Control of Brucellosis

 

Technical Papers

 

Acute Fasioliasis in Flocks of District Srinagar

Dr. Syed Moin ul haq


            The susceptibility to the diseases is always higher in exotic or improved breeds than the native or local ones, and ever since the exotic blood was introduced in the sheep flocks of J&K, prevalence of the diseases also increased. The department of sheep husbandry responded well and a very good mechanism of flock health care with more emphasis on preventive medication and disease control was set in position. The department has been laying more stress on control of parasitic diseases and more than half of the budget allotted for drugs and therapeutic agents is utilized on anthelminthic drenching and rightly so as these infestations not only sometimes cause heavy mortality among the flocks but also cause great economic losses due to reduction in production.

             Srinagar district though more than eighty percent urbanised has a substantial and good quality crossbred sheep population reared in around 110 peripheral villages or suburbs. Topographically, the district can be divided grossly into three sheep rearing zones.
Hilly areas in east and south east of Srinagar like Dara, Faqirgujree, Brane, Nishat, Khimber, Khanmoh, Zewan and Zawoora etc

  • Plain and marshy areas in the west and north west like Mujgund, Panzinara, Malroo, Laweypora, Palpora and Sangam etc.

  • Plain and orchard areas of central Srinagar like Zakura, Gulabbagh, Batpora Saedpora, Telbal, Noubugh and Umerhair etc.


              In the marshy lands of west and northwest of the city, with about sixteen thousand sheep population, some big flocks of sheep are reared and during spring and autumn maintained by grazing on the banks of the river Jehlum. Acute Fascioliasis associated with Black Disease has been affecting and causing deaths in these flocks for many years.

TABLE SHOWING VILLAGE WISE MORTALITY DUE TO ACUTE FASIOLIASIS

YEAR 2009

Name of the village Total sheep population No. of deaths recorded Percentage mortality
Palpora 1650 18 1.0
Goripora 1200 25 2.0
Cochun 500 5 1.0
Bakshipora 350 3 0.85
Mujgund 700 8 1.1
Panzinara 600 7 1.1
Total 5000 66 1.32


YEAR 2010

Name of the village Total sheep population No. of deaths recorded Percentage mortality
Guzarbal 400 8 2.0
Shunglipora 1800 30 1.6
Palpora 1800 7 0.3
Goripora 1700 34 2.0
Chochun 575 18 3.1
Bakshipora 420 4 0.9
Sangam, Bajiwudri 1750 21 1.2
Malroo 850 8 0.9
Total 9295 130 1.3

YEAR 2011

Name of the village Total sheep population No. of deaths recorded Percentage mortality
Chochun 530 2 0.3
Sangam 730 8 1.0
Bajiwudri 1000 2 0.2
Total 2250 12 0.5


         
Acute fascioliasis is caused by Fasciola hepatica which has liver as its site of predilection. The intermediate stage involves snails. The two primary requirements for establishment of the liverflukes are snails and an environment that suits fluke eggs, the snails and the larval flukes such as slow moving streams with marshy banks, irrigation channels and seepages. The affected areas in Srinagar present optimal conditions and in the months of late autumn, November and December, mortality was recorded during the years in question. Deaths in almost all the cases were peracute. Post mortem examination conducted in most of the cases by experts of Disease Investigation Laboratory revealed liver damage caused by migrating young flukes and severe haemorrhage with blood in abdomen. The condition was associated in almost in all cases with Black disease as the damage by young flukes provides suitable environment for germination of spores of Clostridium novyi type B.

Liver of ram showing acute fascioliasis and juandice Liver of an ewe showing damage due to acute fascioliasis Liver damage due to Black Disease associated with

                                                                                                 
Control measures adopted:
The department being sensitive to the losses that occurred during the previous year's took appropriate measures during 2011 and the flocks in the risk areas were given strategic drenching of oxyclozanide and closantal during the months of September and October and then Triclabandazole @ 10mg/kg body wt. every three weeks during November and December in the high risk villages where deaths due to the disease had previously occurred. Flocks in the area were also given MCC vaccine. Farmers were also sensitised and advised to improve the plan of nutrition during winter months and both morbidity and mortality drastically reduced during the season.

ASSESSMENT OF GROWTH IN PURCHASED RAMS OF DISTRICT SRINAGAR
Dr. Andleeb Rafiq   
Technical Officer

District Sheep Husbandry Office, Srinagar

District Srinagar, which is spread over an area of 293 sq. kms is about 80% urbanized with very little agriculture and allied activities. Out of a total of 136 villages in the peripheries, sheep rearing is practiced in about 110 villages with farmers having average holding of 30-40 sheep. Sheep have multi-faceted utility including meat, wool, skin, manure, and to some extent milk & transport and thus helps it to play an important role in the agrarian economy. District Srinagar has an important history as the cross breeding programme in the state has started from the Zakura area of Srinagar and this area has always been rich in sheep farming and some prominent sheep farmers have been from this area. The cross breed sheep population in the district is almost 100% percent and the Departmental activities including further upgradation of the flocks in terms of mutton and wool growth are continuing. Since the flocks in Srinagar are quite superior in terms of productivity than the rams from the Departmental farms, the Department as its one of the most important programmes provides the flocks with good quality rams for genetic improvement and up gradation of the flocks. The Department has in absence of any foreign importation of rams in the recent past and least likely to be in near future, developed a policy of introducing "elite" or the best amongst the best Rams obtained from the local gene pool into the flocks. These elite rams with phenotypic characteristics of quick growth without compromising on the wool quality are identified, selected and purchased from local sheep farmers on encouraging and good remunerative prices and kept under local conditions with the flocks.
In District Srinagar, the purchase and use of such rams started during December, 2009 when 12 rams were purchased upto March, 2010 under Centrally Sponsored scheme RKVY. Out of the 12 Rams, 8 were Milk tooth (age group of 11-14 months) and 4 Ram were two teeth (age group of 18-21 months).
The body weight statistics of the Rams at the time of purchase was:
Mean body weight of MT Rams =40.8 kgs
Maximum body weight =49 kgs
Minimum body weight =36 kgs
Mean body weight of 2T Rams =46.66 kgs
Maximum body weight =49 kgs
Minimum body weight =43 Kgs
 
During the month of November 2010, 26 more rams were purchased under another Centrally Sponsored Scheme, SWIS and were put in the field for breeding. 12 rams purchased were milk tooth (MT) and rest 14 rams were two teeth (2T), age group of 18-22 months.
The body weight statistics of the Rams at the time of purchase:
Mean body weight of 12 MT Rams =36.8 kgs
Maximum body weight = 43 kgs
Minimum body weight = 33 kgs
Mean body weight of 14 2T Rams = 47.90 kgs
Maximum body weight = 64 kgs
Minimum body weight = 41 kgs

Furthermore, during the month of October 2011, 15 more rams were purchased under RKVY and 5 rams under SWIS and again put in the field for the purpose of breeding. 6 rams purchased were MT, 5 rams were 2T, and out of the remaining 4 rams, 2 were 4T and 1 ram was 6T.
The body weight statistics of the Rams at the time of purchase:
Mean body weight of 6 MT Rams =55.25 kgs
Maximum body weight =67 kgs
Minimum body weight =40 kgs
Mean body weight of 14 2T Rams =60 kgs
Maximum body weight =63 kgs
Minimum body weight =58 kgs

In September 2012, 9 rams were purchased again under RKVY; out of which 1 ram was MT and rest 8 rams were 2T.
The body weight statistics of the Rams at the time of purchase:
Body weight of one MT Ram =50 kgs
Mean body weight of 8 2T Rams =51.75 kgs
Maximum body weight =57 kgs
Minimum body weight =50 kgs

All the purchased animals were kept with the local flocks in field conditions doing unrestricted breeding, shifted to high land pastures mostly in the Sonamarg sector during summer months and adjusted with breeders during winter months of 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. The farmers during winter months feed the livestock with fodder mostly straws and hay, tree toppings and concentrates mostly wheat bran and rice bran in very little quantities.
The body weight (in kgs) of all these rams was recorded in the following intervals for the assessment of growth and the statistics as under:

 

OBSERVATIONS ON GROWTH OF RAMS FOR A PERIOD 36 MONTHS

 

S. No

Age group at the time of purchase

Mean B Wt. at the time of purchase

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

Mean B wt. after 3 years

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

GAIN

1

MT

40.8

49

36

49

55

44

+8.2 kgs

2

2T

46.66

49

43

48

50

47

+1.34  kgs

OBSERVATIONS ON GROWTH OF RAMS FOR A PERIOD 24 MONTHS

 

S. No

Age group at the time of purchase

Mean B Wt. at the time of purchase

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

Mean B wt. after 3 years

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

GAIN

1

MT

38.13

49

33

45.20

51

42

+7.07 kgs

2

2T

47.64

64

41

49.92

70

43

+2.28 kgs

OBSERVATIONS OF GROWTH OF RAMS FOR A PERIOD OF 12 MONTHS

 

S. No

Age group at the time of purchase

Mean B Wt. at the time of purchase

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

Mean B wt. after 3 years

Max. B wt.

Min. B wt.

GAIN

1

MT

41.73

67

33

42.9

53

35

+1.17 kgs

2

2T

49.82

64

41

48.47

55

44

-1.35 kgs

OVERALL OBSERVATIONS
        The data reveals that the overall body weight has shown an increasing trend in both the categories of rams i.e. rams purchased as milk tooth as well as those purchased as two teeth. The body weight recording in Milk tooth rams for a period of 36 months has shown an overall gain of +8.2 kgs and with substantial increase of 6 kgs in maximum body weight and a 8 kgs gain in the minimum body weight. Similarly, recordings of 23-24 months period have shown an overall gain of +7.07 kgs in the body weight in Milk tooth rams with maximum body weight showing a gain of 2 kgs and the minimum body weight showing an increase of 6 kgs, indicating a satisfactory growth pattern of these rams. In case of 11-12 months recording of body weight, there was a growth of 1.17 kgs in Milk tooth rams with a negative gain in the maximum body weight and an increase of 2 kgs in the minimum body weight.
        In case of 2T rams, over the period of 36 months, there has been a growth of 1.34 kgs with maximum body weight showing an increase of 1 kg and minimum body weight showing an increase of 4 kgs in weight. In a period of 23-24 months, a growth of 2.28 kgs was recorded with a gain of 6 kgs in maximum body weight and a gain of 2 kgs in the minimum body weight. However, in 11-12 month period, there was a negative growth of 1.35 kgs with a decrease of 9 kgs in the maximum body weight and an increase of 3 kgs in the minimum body weight. The decreases could possibly be attributed to breeding stress as these mature rams were continuously in the flocks during breeding season.

 

PERIOD

MILK TOOTH

TWO TEETH

 

 Gain in avg. b. wt.

Gain in avg. b. wt.

36 Months

+ 8.2 kgs

+1.34 kgs

24 Months

+ 7.07 kgs

+2.28 kgs

12 Months

+ 1.17 kgs

-1.35 kgs

Further, the raw data also revealed that the mortality was more in two teeth rams as compared to the milk tooth rams.
CONCLUSION:
It appears from the study that the animals purchased as MT have grown better during 1st, 2nd and the 3rd year of their purchase as compared to those purchased as 2T during these years. It also appears from the study that animals purchased with less body weight have shown more increase in body weight during the 1st, 2nd and the 3rd year of their purchase probably due to reason that heavier rams might have undergone stress due to more breeding.       

 

EFFICACY AND ACCEPTANCE OF COMMONLY USED ANTHELMINTIC FOR CONTROL AND TREATMENT OF SHEEP PARASITES IN DISTRICT BANDIPORA IN DISTRICT BANDIPORA   

 

Vaccination Schedule

 

S.NO

Disease

Vaccination Schedule

Expected month for vaccination in a year

Dose & Route

Remarks

Primary

Regular Vaccine

1

Enterotexaemia

Lambs vaccinated at two months of age with a booster dose 21 days to 1 month later. These born to unvaccinated ewes should be vaccinated with 1st dose 1-2 weeks and as booster dose later from 21 days to 1 month

Pregnant ewes 1.5 month before lambing and a booster 1 month before lambing (i.e. 15-21 days gap between the two annually)

December-January for pregnant animals and March-April for dry flock and male livestock. Repeated in September/October for the latter.

1 ml or

2 ml S/C

Regular vaccination along with booster dose is necessary. Animals vaccinated in first time in April/May with a booster dose 21 days later

2

 

 

Sheep Pox

At the age of 3 month & above.

Annually in case of live & biannually in case of killed vaccine.

March or April.

1 ml I/M

5ml s/c

Regular vaccination is necessary

3

Goat Pox

At the age of  3 month & above

Annually

March or April

1 ml S/C

Regular vaccination is necessary

4

FMD

3 & month and above

Twice in a year

March & September

1 ml S/C or

1 ml I/M

Regular vaccination is necessary

5

PPR

4 month 7 above

Every 3 years interval

April

1 ml/ S/C

Regular vaccination is necessary

 

Dosing Schedule

 

When to suspect parasitic Infestation:

  • Stunted growth.

  • Prolonged diarrhoea.

  • White or pale mucous membrane of eyes.

  • Get faecal examination done before going for dosing.


IN ENDEMIC AREAS, MARSHY WATER-LOGGED LANDS OR WHERE ANIMALS ARE FED PADDY STRAW, THREE DOSING WITH BROAD SPECTRUM ANTHELMINTICS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES ARE SUFFICIENT PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST HELMINTHES:  
      

15 FEBRUARY TO 15 MARCH 15 JUNE TO 15 JULY 15 OCTOBER TO 15 NOVEMBER

NEED BASED DOSING AFTER PROPER TESTING AND ASSESSING PARASITIC LOAD MAY ALSO BE DONE AT ANY TIME.


 Dos and Don'ts
*Don't overdose or under-dose.
*Pregnant animals can be dosed with pregnancy safe anthelmintics like Closental whenever required. However avoiding of any medication during pregnancy is desirable.
*Don't use Albendazole and Mebendazole –in 1st trimester of pregnancy.
*Frequently change the drug for dosing to avoid development of resistance.
*Chop the paddy straw 2 inches at the base and then feed the animals to prevent Fascioliasis.
*Coccidiostats should be given to lambs and kids whenever required.
*More concentration of animals in a grazing area warrants greater attention on parasitic diseases. It also calls for one dosing in high land pastures after some time of migration as worm load accumulates.
*Give appropriate dose of medicine as per recommendation of qualified veterinarian.

 

Livestock Statistics

of Kashmir Division

 
POPULATION
Year Sheep Goat
1950 2.33 Lac 0.65 Lac
1990 11.65 Lac 1.93 Lac
2019 17.684 Lac 3.83 Lac
PRODUCTION
Year Mutton
(in Lac kgs)
Wool
(in Lac kgs)
1950 7.4 0.89
1990 53.99 15.98
2019 112.1 32.75

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: I want to start a Sheep Farm, How is Sheep Husbandry department helpful in this manner.
A: Technical guidance is being provided at every step, be it the purchase of Livestock, construction of shelters, also Logistic support is being provided like in terms of medication, free of cost breeding cover in terms of High Quality Breeding Rams being provided .

Q: Which breed is better for gaining more profit in less time?
A: Selection of breed depends upon the area where the sheep farm is to be established, keeping in view the climate and topography of Kashmir division, Kashmir Merino is the considering the best suitable breed. In case of Hortipastoral system like if you have enough orchard land you can have Corriedale breed as it is the best breed as they are polled and have short stature, these two characters make this breed best suitable for grazing in orchards.

Q: How much land is required to start 25 Ewes Sheep Unit?
A: 8 sq.ft. Per animal, it is the accurate space required per animal, so for 25 Ewes, you may need 200 sq.ft. Shed. In addition to this if you have more land,i t is more advantageous as far as feeding or grazing area is concerned.

Q: How is your department helpful in providing Logistic support or medical support?
A: Our employees will assist you in choosing the best breed by taking in view the genotypic and phenotypic characters, selection of hybrid breed, wool qualities, length of legs, scrotal girth, our technical experts can say which breed is best for your start up and will help you in choosing those breeds. We also give you medicines on subsidized rates and all the services are being provided at your door step , free of cost breeding cover is being provided by the department by providing you a Hybrid Ram of Superior Quality.

Q: Is there any insurance scheme which will be helpful in case of any calamity.
A: It is mandatory to cover your Livestock with insurance as far as government schemes are concerned, but the insurance has to borne by breeder, as department is not providing any insurance policy.

Q: How many times an animal is to be sheared in a year.
A: Two times in a year, pre migration and post migration from Highland Pastures.

Q: Is it necessary to send the livestock to Highland Pastures during summer.
A: Yes, it is important to send your livestock to Highland Pastures, the sheep is an animal which is Heat Stress Prone, so it is very difficult for such an animal to remain in plains during high temperature. It gets its favourable temperature only in Highland Pastures. Also there is enough availability of Nutrition's grasses on Highland Pastures. There are also some grasses which are Anti Parasitic and thus help the livestock to remain free from some parasitcl diseases. Another most benefit of Highland Pastures is that you don't need to put any expenses on feeding of animals at Highland Pastures.

Q: What are the different Schemes providing by your department?
A: There are various schemes currently our department is providing,
Click Here to scheme details.

Q: Is there any particular vaccination/dosing schedule to be maintained for the livestock.
A: Yes, you have to follow the vaccination/dosing schedule provided by our department.
For Vaccination schedule
Click Here
For Dosing schedule
Click Here

Q: What are the various nutrition requirements during winter for the livestock?
A: Winter is an hurdle for sheep rearing in Kashmir Division, so stall feeding is the only option during winters, concentrates are also given which can be brought from the market.
i. Concentrate feed @ 500gm/adult animal/day and hay @1.5 kg/animal/day.
ii. Chopped vegetables like carrots, turnips @ 0.5kg /Pregnant Ewe/Doe/day.
iii. Molasses @ 30-60 gms /day/pregnant Ewe/Doe to prevent pregnancy toxaemia.
iv. Creep ration (crushed maize 40%, wheat bran 20%, oats 15%, ground nut cake 21%, mineral mixture 1.5%, salt 1%, molasses 1.5%) @ 50-100 gms /lamb/kid/day.
v. Legumes should be mixed with bhusa to prevent bloat.
vi. Ensure clean, fresh and lukewarm water in adequate quantities to prevent colic and impaction.
vii. Strictly avoid early morning grazing on frosty herbs and snow covered grasses which otherwise cause's huge losses by way of diseases like Braxy/Bradsot.
viii. Additional feed increments to pregnant / lactating animals to prevent metabolic disorders.

Q: What are the various requirements for makings suitable shelter in winter for the livestock?
A: i. The shed should be warm (about 20C) but properly ventilated to avoid accumulation of ammonia gas which predisposes to respiratory animals.
ii. The floor of the shed should be clean and dry to prevent foot rot, coccidiosis and other diseases.
iii. Suitable bedding like dry leaves, rags, bhusa, saw dust etc to a thickness of 4-6 inches should be used to prevent from cold.
iv. Adequate space for animals to prevent overcrowding.

Q: Is there any extra care to be taken for pregnant ewes and new born babies.
A: yes extra care is to be provided, Pregnant animals can be dosed with pregnancy safe anthelmintics like Closental whenever required. However avoiding of any medication during pregnancy is desirable.
Don't use Albendazole and Mebendazole - in 1st trimester of pregnancy.
Molasses @ 30-60 gms /day/pregnant Ewe/Doe to prevent pregnancy toxaemia
Use of Anti coccidial drugs to prevent coccidial disease in new born lambs/kids.
Coccidiostats should be given to lambs and kids whenever required.

Q: What are the various methods to keep the unshorn wool clean?
A: Avoid over crowding, timely dipping, shed must be clean hygienic, you can also use some specific shampoos which can be brought from the market.

Q: How can an animal be protected from various Ectoparasitic and endoparastic diseases?
A: For ectopararities you can have,
Timely dipping, Ivermectin injection, timely shearing.
For endoparasites you can use clean pasture concept which means deworming and dosing before migration to highland pastures also keeping the sheds clean and doing timely dosing, deworming and vaccination after the downward migration of livestock from highland pastures.

 

Telephone Directory

Name of the Officer Designation Landline Mobile No E mail
Mr. Bashir Ahmad Khan (KAS) Director, SHD Kashmir 0194-2311063 0194-2311355 9419068392
7006786507
kashmirmerino.sheep@gmail.com
dirsheepkmr@nic.in
Dr.Basharat Amin Kuthu Joint Director Farms, SHD Kashmir 0194-2310496 9419005867,
7006779055
jdfarmsshdkashmir@gmail.com
Dr.Ajay Sudan Joint Director Extension, SHD Kashmir 0194-2311614 9906708433 extensionjd1@gmail.com
Dr.Syed Moin-ul-Haq Dy. Director (Central) SHD Kashmir 0194-2310604 9419002401 rufaismoin@gmail.com
Dr Syed Moin-ul-Haq Dy. Director (F&F), SHD Kashmir 0194-2310604 9419002401 rufaismoin@gmail.com
Dr. Mohd. Amin Dar Assistant Project Officer (APO) 0194-2310604 9419097890 todshkash@gmail.com
Dr.Imran Hameed Geneticist 0194-2310604 9469343488 todshkash@gmail.com
Dr.Waseem Sultan Wani Store Officer, SHD Kashmir 0194-2310604 7006340114  
Dr.Hilal Ahmad Jr. Epidemiologist 0194-2310604 9858861087 todshkash@gmail.com
Dr.Imran Nazir Technical Officer (Gen.) to Director 0194-2310604 9469990000 todshkash@gmail.com
Dr. Naseer Shabnum Technical Officer (Schemes) to Director 0194-2310604 7006113002 todshkash@gmail.com
Ms. Yenbuerzal Accounts Officer, SHD Kashmir 0194-2310604 9018974396 aosheepkmr@gmail.com
Dr. Maroof Hussain Shah Dy.Director Resaerch Disease Investigation Lab, Nowshera Srinagar 0194-2429970 7780806027,
9596469405
ddrshdkashmir@gmail.com
Dr.Shamim Incharge Principal Training Class, Nowshera Srinagar 0194-2420447 9419026949 wanishamim93@gmail.com
Dr.Shamim Incharge Fleece Testing Officer, Nowshera Srinagar   9419026949 fto.nowshera123@gmail.com
Dr.Basharat Amin Kuthu Dy.Director, SBF, Khimber/Dachigam   9419005867,
7006779055
sbf.dachigam123@gmail.com
Dr.Mohammad Ashraf Bokad Dy.Director,SBF,Daksum   7006766395 daksumsbf@gmail.com
Dr Quasheed Hussain Asstt.Director,SBF,Goabal 0194-2416040 7006977148,
9419023645
sbfgoabal@gmail.com
Dr.Tariq Ahmad Malik Asstt.Director,SBF,Kralpathri   9906688490 adsbfk123@gmail.com
Dr.Ashiq Ashraf Asstt.Director,SBF,Poshnar   7889624832 adposhnar@gmail.com
Dr.Asif Ali Ganie Asstt.Director,SBF,Zawoora   7006681732 sbfzawoora@gmail.com
Dr.Faisal Nazir Asstt.Director,SBF,Hardshiva     adsbfhardushiva@gmail.com
Dr.Firdous Asstt.Director,SBF,Kewa   7780841216 oisbfkewa@gmail.com
Dr.Sheikh Ishrat Asstt.Director,Angoora Rabbit Farm,Wussan   7780856867 arfwussan101@gmail.com
Dr.Zubair Ahsan Kabli District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Anantnag 01932-222542 7889555422 dshoa.sheep@gmail.com
Dr.Peer Irshad District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Baramulla 01952-235038 7006349758 dsho.bla@gmail.com
Dr.Showkat Ahmad Ahanger District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Bandipora 01957-225511 7889958645 dshobandipora@gmail.com
Dr.Mohd Ashraf Baba District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Budgam 01951-255229 9797206001 budgamdsho@gmail.com
Dr Javid Ahmad Baba District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Ganderbal 0194-2416040 7006561452,
9419424765
dshogbl@gmail.com
Dr.Rafiq Ahmad Shah District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Kulgam 01931-260521 9906378722,
9419730805
dshokulgam@gmail.com
Dr.Mohammad Haider District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Kupwara 01955-252220 9419026854 doshdkupwara@gmail.com
Dr.Mohammad Shafi Mir District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Pulwama 01933-241215 9419044407 sheeppula@gmail.com
Dr.Rafiq Ahmad Shah District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Shopian 01933-260656 9906378722,
9419730805
dshospn61@gmail.com
Dr.Ajay Sudan District Sheep Husbandry Officer, Srinagar 0194-2425954 9906708433 dshosrinagar27@gmail.com

Notice Board

Date Subject
23-01-2021 Celebration of Republic Day (26th January, 2021)
16-01-2021 Procurement of Good Quality Breeding Rams (Merino/Corriedale) in sizable number across 10 districts of the Valley
13-01-2021 Representation of Ms. Shakeela, Laboratory boy and redressal of grievances
15-12-2020 Date Sheet for Supplementary Examination of Stock Assistant Trainees (Valley Batch 2018-19)
02-12-2020 Supplementary Examination of Stock Assistant Trainees session 2018-19
05-12-2020 NOTIFICATION: Selection list of Stock Assistant (item no: 157 (04 of 2017) dt:28/11/2017
04-12-2020 Auction of Wool 2020-21 (Terms and Conditions)